HIS 4294 Society and Politics of Post-Colonial Sri Lanka

Course Description:
This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of the political changes that took place in Sri Lanka since independence. The central themes of the course are the history of institutional development, political crises Sri Lanka experienced after independence, the rise of ethno nationalism, changes to party politics and changes in the politics of resistance.
Learning Objectives:
The objective of the course is to make students aware of the prominent features of the political and socio economic developments of Sri Lanka since independence. The course will examine such developments from an analytical perspective.

Learning Outcomes:
At the end of this course, students should be able to:

• Explain the major transformations that Sri Lanka underwent since independence
• Describe how the historical changes reached out to determine the shape of present-day Sri Lanka

Course Content:
1. Theorizing historical trends in post colonial politics
2. Changing economic, social and constitutional developments
3. Evolution of party politics and its changes
4. Political violence, riots and rebellions in the South
5. Rise of ethno-nationalism and separatist movements
6. Rise of Women’s movements
7. International community and local politics

Assessment:
Midterm test 20%
Midterm assignment 20%
Final Exam 60%

Recommended Readings:
Asheroft, G. et al., (2005). Key Concepts in Post-Colonial Studies. London: Routledge.
Base, S. and Jalal, A. (2004). Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy, London: Routledge.
Lakshman,W.D. and Tisdell C.A. (2000). Sri Lanka’s Development since independence: Socio-Economic Perspectives and Analyses. New York: Nova Science Publisher.
Roberts, M. (ed) (1998). Sri Lanka: Collective Identities Revisited Vol. II. Colombo: Marga Institute.
Wickramasinghe, N. (2006). Sri Lanka in the Modern Age: A History of Contested Identities. Colombo: Vijitha Yapa.
Shastri, A. and Wilson A.J. (2001). The Post-Colonial States in South Asia. New York: Palgrave.